A girl warmed herself near a traditional stove at her family’s home in Herat, Afghanistan, Friday. Aref Karimi/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

A girl warmed herself near a traditional stove at her family’s home in Herat, Afghanistan, Friday. Aref Karimi/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

Members of a local winter swimming club Alexander Klyukin, left, and Vladimir Korabelnikov swam in the Yenisei River during their weekly session in the town of Divnogorsk, Siberia, Friday. The temperature was around minus 22 degrees Fahrenheit. Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

Members of a local winter swimming club Alexander Klyukin, left, and Vladimir Korabelnikov swam in the Yenisei River during their weekly session in the town of Divnogorsk, Siberia, Friday. The temperature was around minus 22 degrees Fahrenheit. Ilya Naymushin/Reuters

A Japanese Macaque (or Snow Monkey) soaks in a hot spring at a snow-covered valley in Yamanouchi town, central Japan January 20, 2014.  REUTERS/Issei Kato

A Japanese Macaque (or Snow Monkey) soaks in a hot spring at a snow-covered valley in Yamanouchi town, central Japan January 20, 2014. REUTERS/Issei Kato

A man runs as he carries a child who survived from what activists say was an airstrike by forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at al-Ferdaws in Aleppo January 21, 2014. REUTERS/Ammar Abdullah

A man runs as he carries a child who survived from what activists say was an airstrike by forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, at al-Ferdaws in Aleppo January 21, 2014. REUTERS/Ammar Abdullah

The uncles of Pakistani student Zoubair Latif, 17 years old, who was killed in a suicide bombing, mourned him in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Monday. A bomb ripped through a busy market Monday morning in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, killing at least nine people in the latest Pakistani Taliban attack targeting the country’s military. Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press

The uncles of Pakistani student Zoubair Latif, 17 years old, who was killed in a suicide bombing, mourned him in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Monday. A bomb ripped through a busy market Monday morning in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, killing at least nine people in the latest Pakistani Taliban attack targeting the country’s military. Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press

A villager arranged red lanterns at Xubeizhang Village, in central China’s Henan Province, Monday, in preparation for the coming Lunar New Year on Jan. 31. ZUMA Press

A villager arranged red lanterns at Xubeizhang Village, in central China’s Henan Province, Monday, in preparation for the coming Lunar New Year on Jan. 31. ZUMA Press

Kabul, Afghanistan. November 2002. Seamus Murphy/VII.

I took this picture in 2002, but I found it this year by chance, researching images for a magazine story and a book on Afghan women’s poetry. I was looking for something else and scanned it for the first time this year. I might never have seen it again, which makes it fresh for me.It was taken in the National Gallery in West Kabul in November, 2002, one year after the Taliban had fled the city in the wake of renewed foreign interest in Afghanistan after 9/11. It was part of an assortment of so-called ‘idolatrous’ art works in the gallery showing the human face that had been damaged by the Taliban. Feeling happy to have found examples of Taliban intolerance, I was anxious, as I posed the gallery-attendant, that the picture would be too contrived. Perhaps that’s one reason the image existed unscanned for years. Interesting how I see the picture differently now.Like many photographers, I remember clearly the day I took it; what was going on in my life, how I was feeling, what I was looking for, what seemed important to me to photograph at that time. It was late morning and I remember feeling hungry. All of this came tumbling back when I discovered the black-and-white negative and looked at it on a lightbox. Negative. Lightbox. To some, this might sound like another era. But, in addition to everything else it does, any photograph—taken in 2013, yesterday, a minute ago, or a hundred years ago—on the oldest or the latest technology, is inevitably a record of the past.—Seamus Murphy.

Kabul, Afghanistan. November 2002. Seamus Murphy/VII.

I took this picture in 2002, but I found it this year by chance, researching images for a magazine story and a book on Afghan women’s poetry. I was looking for something else and scanned it for the first time this year. I might never have seen it again, which makes it fresh for me.

It was taken in the National Gallery in West Kabul in November, 2002, one year after the Taliban had fled the city in the wake of renewed foreign interest in Afghanistan after 9/11. It was part of an assortment of so-called ‘idolatrous’ art works in the gallery showing the human face that had been damaged by the Taliban. Feeling happy to have found examples of Taliban intolerance, I was anxious, as I posed the gallery-attendant, that the picture would be too contrived. Perhaps that’s one reason the image existed unscanned for years. Interesting how I see the picture differently now.

Like many photographers, I remember clearly the day I took it; what was going on in my life, how I was feeling, what I was looking for, what seemed important to me to photograph at that time. It was late morning and I remember feeling hungry. All of this came tumbling back when I discovered the black-and-white negative and looked at it on a lightbox. Negative. Lightbox. To some, this might sound like another era. But, in addition to everything else it does, any photograph—taken in 2013, yesterday, a minute ago, or a hundred years ago—on the oldest or the latest technology, is inevitably a record of the past.—Seamus Murphy.

Together, Alone- This portrait of two identical twins (Nils and Emil, 15 years old) in Fyn, Denmark, is part of a series of pictures, portraying people who have a strong connection to another person and who often think of themselves as a ‘we’ instead of ‘me’. Photo and caption by Cecile Baudier/National Geographic Photo Contest

Together, Alone- This portrait of two identical twins (Nils and Emil, 15 years old) in Fyn, Denmark, is part of a series of pictures, portraying people who have a strong connection to another person and who often think of themselves as a ‘we’ instead of ‘me’. Photo and caption by Cecile Baudier/National Geographic Photo Contest

Playing with fire beside the canal in the modern city Songdo, South Korea. Photo and caption by Sungjin Kim/National Geographic Photo Contest

Playing with fire beside the canal in the modern city Songdo, South Korea. Photo and caption by Sungjin Kim/National Geographic Photo Contest

An Indian protester at a demonstration in New Delhi demanding a universal pension for those over age 60. New York Times

An Indian protester at a demonstration in New Delhi demanding a universal pension for those over age 60. New York Times

A man stood in a cloud of smoke and tear gas fired by Egyptian riot police in Cairo Friday. Officials were trying to disperse hundreds of Islamist demonstrators defying a new protest law that has drawn widespread criticism from the international community and democracy advocates. Sabry Khaled/El Shorouk Newspaper/Associated Press

A man stood in a cloud of smoke and tear gas fired by Egyptian riot police in Cairo Friday. Officials were trying to disperse hundreds of Islamist demonstrators defying a new protest law that has drawn widespread criticism from the international community and democracy advocates. Sabry Khaled/El Shorouk Newspaper/Associated Press

A child looked at French police standing guard as Roma families were evacuated from their illegal camp near the Var river in Nice, southeastern France, Wednesday. Eric Gaillard/Reuters

A child looked at French police standing guard as Roma families were evacuated from their illegal camp near the Var river in Nice, southeastern France, Wednesday. Eric Gaillard/Reuters

An Afghan refugee girl attended a daily class for illiterate refugees set at mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday. Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press

An Afghan refugee girl attended a daily class for illiterate refugees set at mosque on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday. Muhammed Muheisen/Associated Press

He Zili ran along an alley outside his home in China’s Zhejiang province Wednesday. The boy injured his head when he was one-year-old and started suffering from mental disorders. According to his family, they had no choice but to restrain him on chains as he had a tendency to attack those around him. William Hong/Reuters

He Zili ran along an alley outside his home in China’s Zhejiang province Wednesday. The boy injured his head when he was one-year-old and started suffering from mental disorders. According to his family, they had no choice but to restrain him on chains as he had a tendency to attack those around him. William Hong/Reuters

An antigovernment protester gave a rose to a Thai soldier in Bangkok Thursday. Wason Wanichakorn/Associated Press

An antigovernment protester gave a rose to a Thai soldier in Bangkok Thursday. Wason Wanichakorn/Associated Press