All of the explanations that have been given to us from the beginning have proven to be false.

Brazilian Communications Minister Paulo Bernardo, rejecting the U.S. government’s attempt to explain the NSA spying so far.

The news of more National Security Agency spying in Brazil comes one week after it emerged the United States has spied on the phone calls and emails of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto. The revelations have sparked a diplomatic uproar and threatened a planned trip by Rousseff to the United States next month. At the G-20 summit in Russia, Rousseff said she raised her concerns directly with President Obama, and added that her visit to the United States will depend on how Obama responds. In an interview with The Hindu newspaper, former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva criticized the NSA spy program and said President Obama should “personally apologize to the world.”

Today at nine this morning, we summoned the ambassador of the United States, Thomas Shannon, to my Cabinet and explained the indignation of the Brazilian government in light of these facts contained in these documents which were revealed. The violations of the communications of our lady president of the republic, from our point of view, this represents an impermissible and unacceptable violation of Brazilian sovereignty.

Luiz Alberto Figueiredo Machado, Brazilian ambassador.

Revelations about spying by the National Security Agency based on leaks by former contractor Edward Snowden are continuing to emerge. On Sunday, the Brazilian news show Fantastico reported that the NSA targeted the emails, text messages and phone calls of the presidents of Brazil and Mexico. The news show used documents provided by journalist Glenn Greenwald, who lives in Brazil and obtained them from Snowden. They included an NSA slide dated June 2012, before Enrique Peña Nieto became president of Mexico, which included messages about his potential picks for Cabinet posts. Both Brazil and Mexico summoned their U.S. ambassadors following the revelations. Mexico called for the United States to investigate, while Brazil’s foreign minister demanded a written explanation and suggested Brazil might cancel an upcoming U.S. visit by President Dilma Rousseff.

Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald’s latest reports show National Security Agency spying has extended to all of Latin America. The surveillance has gone far beyond issues of terrorism claimed by the U.S. government, with areas of focus including Venezuela’s oil industry and Mexico’s energy sector. Brazil says it has set up a task force to investigate the allegations and is still waiting on U.S. diplomats to provide a formal explanation.

In his latest article based on Edward Snowden’s disclosures, the journalist Glenn Greenwald reports today that National Security Agency spying has extended to all of Latin America. After Brazil, Colombia appears to be the second biggest target of NSA surveillance. One NSA document suggests the surveillance covers issues of trade and economics: A priority for Venezuela was listed as “oil” while “energy” was assigned to operations in Mexico.

It is definitely a violation of sovereignty, without a doubt, just as it is a violation of human rights. Now we have to see, without rashness or prejudgment. We have to investigate. Brazil’s position is very clear and very strong: We do not agree in any way with these kinds of interferences, not just in Brazil, but in any country.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has announced a probe of U.S. spying efforts inside its borders.

A report based on documents provided by Edward Snowden says the National Security Agency has tapped into Brazil’s telecommunication network and indiscriminately intercepted, collected and stored the email and telephone records of millions of Brazilians for years. The Brazilian government will look into whether local firms cooperated with the United States.

Rousseff says her government will also raise the spying issue at the United Nations in the hopes of securing new international protections for privacy rights.

We’re talking about the president on an official trip after an official summit being kidnapped.

Bolivia’s U.N. Ambassador Sacha Llorenti Soliz to reporters in Geneva after Bolivian President Evo Morales’ plane was forced to land in Vienna, Austria, after France, Spain, Portugal, and Italy reportedly refused to allow the Presidents plane to fly over their territories.

The plane was forced to land after suspicions arose that Edward Snowden might have been aboard the plane, but after the Presidents plane was searched (with the Presidents permission) Snowden was not found on board.

Several Latin American governments have expressed outrage over the incident, asking for a full explanation as to why the President of a sovereign nation would be refused passage.

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff expressed “outrage and condemnation” while Argentine President Cristina Kirchner said, “we believe this constitutes not only the humiliation of a sister nation but of all South America.”

Evo Morales, himself, said the governments of France, Italy, Portugal and Spain had made a mistake of historic proportions.

Several South American heads of state including the leaders of Ecuador, Uruguay, Argentina, and Venezuela plan to gather Thursday in Cochabamba, Bolivia, in a show of support for Morales

We don’t need the World Cup. We need money for hospitals and education.

Protestors in Brazil demonstrated outside the country’s national stadium to vent their anger at the amount of money the country is spending on staging next year’s World Cup, when Brazil is still lacking in public services.

Munduruku Indians attend a meeting consisting of nearly 150 Indians, who are campaigning against the construction of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in the Amazon, in Brasilia June 5, 2013. Talks between the Indians and the government were suspended a day after Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil’s fast-growing demand for electricity. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

A Munduruku Indian child stands near police as Amazon Indians from different tribes occupy the main construction site of the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam in Vitoria do Xingu, near Altamira in Para State, May 28, 2013. Indians from various tribes returned to force the suspension for the second time in a month, of the dam projected to become the world’s third largest in energy production, opposing it for its impact on the environment and their livelihoods. REUTERS/Lunae Parracho

Venezuela dispute prompts urgent meeting of regional leaders

Several South American presidents will hold an emergency meeting on Thursday in Peru to discuss the political crisis in Venezuela following the disputed election of President Nicolas Maduro, officials said on Wednesday.
Senior government officials did not say if the meeting was being held as a show of support for Maduro, or whether regional leaders wanted to issue a collective call for calm in Venezuela, where protests have flared since Maduro’s narrow win by about 2 percentage points.
Maduro, the chosen successor to deceased former President Hugo Chavez, will be sworn in on Friday.
The governments of Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Bolivia and Argentina, among others, have recognized Maduro’s victory, but Washington has not.
The meeting will be held under the umbrella of regional group Unasur in Lima on Thursday evening, senior government officials said. Peru holds the rotating presidency of the group. Unasur election monitors have said Maduro’s win was legitimate.
The presidents of Peru, Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil will attend the meeting and other leaders may also participate, officials said.
The outcome of Sunday’s presidential vote has been rejected by his rival, Henrique Capriles, who has alleged thousands of irregularities at polling centers and wants a full audit of the ballots.
Eight people have died in opposition-led protests. The government has accused Capriles of inciting violence, which he has denied.

Venezuela dispute prompts urgent meeting of regional leaders

Several South American presidents will hold an emergency meeting on Thursday in Peru to discuss the political crisis in Venezuela following the disputed election of President Nicolas Maduro, officials said on Wednesday.

Senior government officials did not say if the meeting was being held as a show of support for Maduro, or whether regional leaders wanted to issue a collective call for calm in Venezuela, where protests have flared since Maduro’s narrow win by about 2 percentage points.

Maduro, the chosen successor to deceased former President Hugo Chavez, will be sworn in on Friday.

The governments of Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Bolivia and Argentina, among others, have recognized Maduro’s victory, but Washington has not.

The meeting will be held under the umbrella of regional group Unasur in Lima on Thursday evening, senior government officials said. Peru holds the rotating presidency of the group. Unasur election monitors have said Maduro’s win was legitimate.

The presidents of Peru, Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil will attend the meeting and other leaders may also participate, officials said.

The outcome of Sunday’s presidential vote has been rejected by his rival, Henrique Capriles, who has alleged thousands of irregularities at polling centers and wants a full audit of the ballots.

Eight people have died in opposition-led protests. The government has accused Capriles of inciting violence, which he has denied.

A Brazilian Indian boy draws on the ground during a protest where Indians from various parts of Brazil occupy the Chamber of Deputies in Brasilia April 16, 2013. They are protesting against a proposed constitutional amendment which gives power to Congress, rather than the Executive Branch, to decide on the demarcation of indigenous lands and reserves in Brazil. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino