Rinko Kikuchi | ph. Marcus Mam

(Source: doinels, via thehappyscavenger)

reuterspictures:

The Gaza offensive

Top image: Dana, the sister of Israeli soldier Tsafrir Bar-Or, mourns during his funeral in Holon near Tel Aviv July 21, 2014. REUTERS/Daniel Bar-On

Bottom image: A Palestinian woman wearing clothes stained with the blood of other relatives, who medics said were wounded in Israeli shelling, cries at a hospital in Gaza City July 20, 2014. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem

All my grandma wanted for the last year was a red door. Today’s the day.

All my grandma wanted for the last year was a red door. Today’s the day.

"The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything."

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

(Source: luvyourselfsomeesteem, via veganweedsoup)

(Source: latinorebels, via veganweedsoup)


But to be such a conduit — you burn so brightly, then you burn to the ground. Who knows what would’ve happened if Clift had never pummeled himself, wildly, madly, into that light pole. Chances are that he would’ve found another pole, literal or figurative, to beat himself against. The other bright, beautiful men of his generation did the same. Dean did it. Brando did it, too, only he didn’t die — he simply turned his disgust with his inability to do so inward.
These men, they were literally something else. I wish I could’ve seen Dean at 50, or Clift living as long, and as fully, as Newman. Clift once told someone that the closer we come to death, the more we blossom. He took himself to that precipice, but he fell straight in. And so he remains, frozen in the popular imagination, circa From Here to Eternity – those high cheekbones, that set jaw, the firm stare: a magnificent, proud, tragically broken thing to behold. (x)

But to be such a conduit — you burn so brightly, then you burn to the ground. Who knows what would’ve happened if Clift had never pummeled himself, wildly, madly, into that light pole. Chances are that he would’ve found another pole, literal or figurative, to beat himself against. The other bright, beautiful men of his generation did the same. Dean did it. Brando did it, too, only he didn’t die — he simply turned his disgust with his inability to do so inward.

These men, they were literally something else. I wish I could’ve seen Dean at 50, or Clift living as long, and as fully, as Newman. Clift once told someone that the closer we come to death, the more we blossom. He took himself to that precipice, but he fell straight in. And so he remains, frozen in the popular imagination, circa From Here to Eternity – those high cheekbones, that set jaw, the firm stare: a magnificent, proud, tragically broken thing to behold. (x)

guys, i don’t know what this blog is doing anymore. i’m so interested in staying informed about injustice and what’s happening around the world. but i am also so interested in Clift, and Brando, and Dean. i’m sorry. idk idk idk i’m sorry.

And so, you know I had Dane and all of a sudden Emory Cohen walks into the room and they were sitting in chairs next to each other. And they were like two young wolves, two alpha males sizing each other up, you know? It was kind of tense actually in the room, so I decided I’d throw in an ice-breaker question at em’ and I said “Who’s your favorite actor?”. And Emory said, “No question, Marlon Brando.”, and Dane says, “Well I always liked James Dean.” And then they started to argue for like ten minutes, who was better, Brando or Dean. And I was like, “This is perfect, this is exactly the dynamic between these two guys. I can trust this.” So anyway I said “Let’s agree to disagree guys, you like Brando, you like Dean, name someone else.” Ane Dane says, “Well I always like Al Pacino.” Then Emory shakes his head like, “DeNiro”. And I love that to me they’re cut from that cloth. Do you know what I mean? I felt like I found the next wave of great actors.

- Derek Cianfrace

(Source: gatsbees, via andyswarhol)


[Montgomery] Clift earned yet another Best Actor nomination, and when he lost…Clift’s position in Hollywood seemed clear. Like [Marlon] Brando, he was an outsider, refusing to submit to any attempt to craft a “star” image, and the rest of the trade disliked him for it. Hollywood shunned Clift, Brando, and their tagalong little brother James Dean because they saw how good they were, saw how clearly they threatened the way that Hollywood had operated — and conceived of acting — for the past 30 years. These boys were the future of American film, and they scared the shit out of everyone still clinging to the past. (x)

[Montgomery] Clift earned yet another Best Actor nomination, and when he lost…Clift’s position in Hollywood seemed clear. Like [Marlon] Brando, he was an outsider, refusing to submit to any attempt to craft a “star” image, and the rest of the trade disliked him for it. Hollywood shunned Clift, Brando, and their tagalong little brother James Dean because they saw how good they were, saw how clearly they threatened the way that Hollywood had operated — and conceived of acting — for the past 30 years. These boys were the future of American film, and they scared the shit out of everyone still clinging to the past. (x)

theletterkilleth:

descentintotyranny:

Israel begins its ground invasion of the Gaza Strip

Firing on medics is a fucking street gang tactic. Israel is run by simple thugs.

(via anarcho-queer)

arabswagger:

The very least you can do for your Palestinian brothers and sisters is to write about them, document their horrors, and commemorate their memory.

What’s happening in the West bank and Gaza is an atrocity, and the mass media manipulation that has neglected and dismissed the blood of our people shall not be ignored anymore.

We are here to stay.  

(via capriciousyouth)

Israel, Palestine mark deadliest day so far in conflict

breakingnews:

New York TimesThe Israeli military says 13 soldiers were killed in Gaza fighting on Sunday, while the Palestinian Health Ministry reported 87 Palestinians died Sunday. The two reported death tolls mark the deadliest day so far.

Follow the latest at Breaking News

fotojournalismus:

Thousands flee Gaza’s Shujaiyah after night of terror | July 20, 2014

They walked in their thousands, barefoot and in their pyjamas, streaming out of the eastern Gaza district of Shujaiyah after a night of non-stop Israeli bombing.

They described hours of terror, as tank shells slammed into homes, with no electricity and no way to escape.They called ambulances, but there was no way for the vehicles to get in under the constant fire.

So in the end, thousands of desperate residents fled on foot at first light, walking two hours or more into Gaza City. They left behind the bodies of the dead in the streets of their neighbourhoods — in Nazzaz, in Shaaf and in other parts of this flashpoint area between Gaza City and the Israeli border.

One of those fleeing was Sabreen Hattad, 34, with her three children. “The Israeli shells were hitting the house. We stayed the night because we were so scared but about six in the morning we decided to escape,” she said. “But where are we supposed to go? The ambulances could not enter and so we ran under shell fire.” Three other men pass by in a hurry clutching bedding in their arms. Asked what they had seen they would only answer: “Death and horror.”

Many of those escaping Shujaiyah made for Gaza’s central Shifa hospital, which was engulfed by chaotic scenes and ambulances ferrying the dead came in a steady steam, among them a local TV cameraman Khaled Hamad and paramedic Fuad Jabir, killed during the overnight offensive, wheeled out wrapped in a bloody plastic shroud. "He wasn’t a fighter, he was a fighter for humanity," wailed one relative as the family buried him. ”He was an ambulance worker, did he deserve to die?” 

Shifa hospital administrator Dr. Hasan Khalas confirmed that 112 Palestinians were killed across Gaza last night, at least 60 dead in Shujaiyah only. Dozens of victims in Shujaiyah haven’t been identified. ”This is the worst I’ve ever seen it,” said Doctor Said Hassan, who has worked at the hospital for eight years.

More than 60 Palestinians were killed, including 17 children, and 210 injured in Shujaiyah massacre so far. The ongoing Israeli military attacks on the Gaza Strip have so far displaced more than 135,000 Palestinians, according to a report. The death toll is expected to rise as Israeli shelling continues and more bodies are uncovered, while today’s total across the Gaza Strip has passed 90 already, bringing the 13-day total death toll to more than 410, with at least 3,000 injured.

Photos:

1. Smoke rises during what witnesses said were heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

2. A wounded Palestinian man reacts after the death of his relatives, who medics said were killed during heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah district, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

3. A Palestinian woman wearing clothes stained with the blood of other relatives, who medics said were wounded in Israeli shelling, cries at a hospital. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

5. A Palestinian woman reacts after the death of her relatives, who medics said were killed during heavy Israeli shelling at the Shujaiyah district, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

6. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

7. A Palestinian woman, who medics said was wounded during heavy Israeli shelling, stands at a hospital. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

8. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

9. Palestinian policemen and medics carry a man, who medics said was wounded in Israeli shelling, at a hospital. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

10. Palestinians flee the Shujaiyah neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

(via humanrightswatch)

thepoliticalnotebook:

2014’s World Cup may be only just over, but the politics of the 2018 World Cup are already a subject of discussion. Over at The Daily Beast, Tunku Varadarajan suggests that a genuine way to punish Vladimir Putin for MH17 (and whatever else) would be to take the World Cup away from Russia. 

How does one punish the autocratic, omnipotent president of a quasi-superpower? It is much harder to do so than to spank the piddling ruler of a smallish rogue state, but options exist. Putin believes that a World Cup in Russia can be sold to his people as an endorsement of his rule. Why should the world become an accomplice in a dictator’s Ponzi scheme of pride? As he preened for the cameras at the World Cup finalin Rio de Janeiro on July 13, it was clear that Putin regards Russia’s staging of the cup’s next edition asa propaganda godsend, a global vote for his achievements. Imagine his consternation if he were prevented from putting on such a show. 

Not that the original choice to award Russia the 2018 slot (or Qatar the 2022) wasn’t already widely criticized based on allegations of kickbacks and vote-buying.
Photo via Getty.

thepoliticalnotebook:

2014’s World Cup may be only just over, but the politics of the 2018 World Cup are already a subject of discussion. Over at The Daily Beast, Tunku Varadarajan suggests that a genuine way to punish Vladimir Putin for MH17 (and whatever else) would be to take the World Cup away from Russia. 

How does one punish the autocratic, omnipotent president of a quasi-superpower? It is much harder to do so than to spank the piddling ruler of a smallish rogue state, but options exist. Putin believes that a World Cup in Russia can be sold to his people as an endorsement of his rule. Why should the world become an accomplice in a dictator’s Ponzi scheme of pride? As he preened for the cameras at the World Cup finalin Rio de Janeiro on July 13, it was clear that Putin regards Russia’s staging of the cup’s next edition asa propaganda godsend, a global vote for his achievements. Imagine his consternation if he were prevented from putting on such a show. 

Not that the original choice to award Russia the 2018 slot (or Qatar the 2022) wasn’t already widely criticized based on allegations of kickbacks and vote-buying.

Photo via Getty.

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